New Work

I’ve been showing you all bits and pieces of my new work while it’s been in progress, but here it is for the first time all in one place. A lot of this work marks quite a new direction for me on the decorating front, and I’m excited to keep investigating it in the new year.

Huge thanks to Cecil and Diane Finch for taking the photos—if not for them, many of these pieces would likely have been smashed in frustration as I made my own futile attempt to take good shots.

Many of these pieces will be in my final MFA portfolio, so I’d love to hear your thoughts!

SEXSE Time at Medalta

Talk about things starting off with a bang here at Medalta! I have no idea where September went, but I do know that it has been a great month, full of new faces and awesome meals. In addition to the four long-term artists in residence all kicking it off in the studios this month, we had five artists from South East Asia in the studios, headed up by the inimitable Vipoo Srivilasa, a Thai born artist who is now based in Australia. South East Asian artists working alongside artists in South Eastern Alberta (hence the name of our show SEXSE, which I now get to put on my CV!).

Vipoo (who I also had the pleasure of hosting during his stay), invited four other ceramic artists from South East Asia to Medalta for a one month residency.  His prerequisites for choosing the artists were, one, that they make great work, and two, that they be good cooks! Needless to say, it made for an amazing combination in the studios—everyone trying to outdo each other both on the making art and making food side. The artists he invited were Thomas Cheong and Teo Huey Min from Singapore, Krisaya Luenganantakul, from Thailand, and Boon Kiat (James) Seet, of Malaysia. All incredibly talented individuals that I feel lucky to call friends.

As a way of getting us all to work towards a common goal, Vipoo instigated the first ever Medalta International Spoon competition. Here are the results:

Front Page News

Naomi Clement

Turns out artists are front page news in Medicine Hat.

The Medicine Hat News came to interview and photograph me and one of the other new artists (Jason Desnoyers) at the studio the other day—a little surreal to be honest, but definitely nice to be in a community that is so supportive of the arts. Imagine my surprise when I found myself on the front page (above the fold too!). Check out the full article here. Perhaps in later years this photo will be shown in one of those “clay stars without their make-up” magazine spreads they have in Ceramics Monthly.

In other news, I’m still settling into my new studio space (which is pretty awesome by the way!). And while I always like the idea of change, I am not so good at the process of it, so I’m trying to be patient and allow myself the space to get acquainted with my new surroundings. My brain wants me to jump right in, but somehow my hands aren’t quite ready. The addition of a radio and the CBC helped a lot over the weekend.

Plainsman ClayI’m also using a new clay body for the first time in years (Plainsman M370) which is taking some getting used to.

So, what with the new clay body, and a way drier environment (my previous studio was a nice damp basement),  I feel like a bit of a beginner again—cracking handles and all.

Right. Patience…

Medalta Bound

In a matter of days I’ll be on my way West to Medicine Hat Alberta, where I have been accepted as one of six, year long artists in residence at Medalta Potteries.

I’ve spent the last two weeks dashing around visiting family and friends before the road trip West, so I really haven’t had much time to process the fact that I am moving to the other side of the country. Now that the car is packed (my years of experience tightly packing a glaze kiln sure came in handy there), I can take a few deep breaths and actually start to get excited.

It’s hard to say what I’m most looking forward to—between the kilns, great studio spaces and all the history at Medalta, there is a lot of scope for awesomeness.  However, if I have to pick one thing that I’m most looking forward to, I’d say it is the community of artists and makers. I’m really looking forward to being surrounded by people who make ceramics a full-time pursuit—there is something about the energy and camaraderie that exists when a group of artists are all working together in a shared space. I can’t wait to get started.

Medalta Crock